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Friday, October 16

Sunday, April 19

  1. page European Award edited What is the European Award for Languages? The European Award for Languages recognises creative way…
    What is the European Award for Languages?
    The European Award for Languages recognises creative ways to improve the quality of language teaching, motivate students and make the best of available resources. If you are involved in an innovative language-learning project, which could benefit others, you may be eligible for an Award.
    ...
    international dimension.
    Award-winning projects provide a potential source of inspiration for other, in different languages, contexts and even different countries, underlining the importance of the criteria that the project be replicable. To date, over 134 UK projects have proved that such criteria can be met and that creative thinking can lead to improved teaching provision and learner achievement.
    What are the prizes?
    ...
    Each year one of the winning projects is selected by the Mary Glasgow Language Trust to receive its annual award (£2,000) – the winner of which is announced at the Award ceremony.
    Mary Glasgow Language Trust Winner 2008 {http://www.cilt.org.uk/images/common/button-arrow-purple.gif}
    ...
    application procedure?
    Applications are invited from schools, colleges, universities, businesses and other institutions engaged in foreign language initiatives, which are innovative, effective and replicable. Visit the applications section and either apply on-line or download the application form and send by e-mail or post.
    ...
    January 2009.
    (sourced from http://www.cilt.org.uk)
    (view changes)
    11:48 am
  2. page EAL edited MFL Framework: Pupils learning English as an additional language (EAL) The inclusion of pupils lea…
    MFL Framework: Pupils learning English as an additional language (EAL)
    The inclusion of pupils learning EAL is a fundamental principle articulated in the National Curriculum 2000. It sets out statutory expectations for their inclusion. MFL Framework objectives and the suggested teaching and learning approaches provide a focus on clear, unambiguous objectives in ways that engage pupils in active learning.
    ...
    study in MFL whichMFLwhich deal with
    The MFL Framework provides for planned progression in language skills, understanding and competence. It encompasses the ability to recognise, understand, use and manipulate the conventions of both oral and written language. Reinforcement of objectives enables pupils to revisit insecure areas of learning while continuing to develop other aspects of language with which they are confident.
    Clear learning objectives will support pupils learning EAL when they are used in a context that builds on prior attainment, and when pupils are fully aware of the substance and purpose of the work. Furthermore, the delivery of objectives through teaching which is highly interactive, and which allows for participative whole-class and group work, will help pupils learning EAL, especially if teachers take full account of their specific needs.
    ...
    talk activities should happen regularly and be evaluated rigorously
    there is a need to overcome the attitude prevalent among pupils that talk does not count as real work.'
    *
    Head of school EAL department praised by Ofsted in 1999
    In MFL lessons, all of the advice given above continues to apply to pupils learning EAL. Language comparisons can sometimes be extended to include references to pupils' home languages. Pupils with EAL will benefit from regular use of the target language by teachers and other pupils, and by the demonstration, modelling and investigation of language structures and functions. The MFL Framework provides for detailed progression through a planned increase in knowledge, skills, understanding and language competence through work in a range of contexts.
    (view changes)
    11:47 am
  3. msg Rods MFL Weblog message posted Rods MFL Weblog Is there anything that you, our students would like to see on the Rodillian MFL weblog which is not…
    Rods MFL Weblog
    Is there anything that you, our students would like to see on the Rodillian MFL weblog which is not on there already? Any particular sort of music in a certain language? Let me know and I will do the best I can :)

    Mrs P.
    11:10 am
  4. msg Finnish? message posted Finnish? Anyone interested in learning Finnish? The course will start in September. Watch out for an email…
    Finnish?
    Anyone interested in learning Finnish?
    The course will start in September.
    Watch out for an email arriving in your inbox with full details about it.

    Mrs P.
    11:08 am

Wednesday, April 15

  1. page Why MFL? edited ... note5_6_a Authentic materials: These could include textual materials of different kinds, vide…
    ...
    note5_6_a
    Authentic materials: These could include textual materials of different kinds, video, television, images or video and audio recordings from the internet.
    (sourced from http://curriculum.qca.org.uk/index.aspx)
    (view changes)
    11:30 pm
  2. page Why MFL? edited ... Languages are part of the cultural richness of our society and the world in which we live and …
    ...
    Languages are part of the cultural richness of our society and the world in which we live and work. Learning languages contributes to mutual understanding, a sense of global citizenship and personal fulfilment. Pupils learn to appreciate different countries, cultures, communities and people. By making comparisons, they gain insight into their own culture and society. The ability to understand and communicate in another language is a lifelong skill for education, employment and leisure in this country and throughout the world.
    Learning languages gives pupils opportunities to develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills and to express themselves with increasing confidence, independence and creativity. They explore the similarities and differences between other languages and English and learn how language can be manipulated and applied in different ways. The development of communication skills, together with understanding of the structure of language, lay the foundations for future study of other languages and support the development of literacy skills in a pupil’s own language.
    Key Concepts
    There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of languages. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding.
    1.1 **Linguistic competence**
    Developing the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in a range of situations and contexts.
    Applying linguistic knowledge and skills to understand and communicate effectively.
    1.2 **Knowledge about language**
    Understanding how a language works and how to manipulate it.
    Recognising that languages differ but may share common grammatical, syntactical or lexical features.
    1.3 **Creativity**
    Using familiar language for new purposes and in new contexts.
    Using imagination to express thoughts, ideas, experiences and feelings.
    1.4 **Intercultural understanding**
    Appreciating the richness and diversity of other cultures.
    Recognising that there are different ways of seeing the world, and developing an international outlook.
    Explanatory notes
    note2_1_a
    The study of languages: This may include major European or world languages, such as Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, Russian, Spanish and Urdu. Schools may choose which languages they teach.
    note2_2_a
    Linguistic competence: Pupils who are competent in using language are able to adapt their knowledge and skills, take the initiative and cope with unexpected responses and unpredictable situations.
    note2_3_a
    Knowledge about language: Pupils should explore and learn about standard structures and patterns.
    note2_4_a
    Manipulate: Pupils should understand how to adapt and reuse language in modified forms for different purposes and contexts. This is essential for being creative with language.
    note2_5_a
    Creativity: The ability to express ideas and feelings using a limited range of language is an important skill for pupils to develop and practise, as it prevents them from feeling frustrated because they are restricted in what they can say and write.
    note2_6_a
    For new purposes and in new contexts: This gives pupils the opportunity to use language imaginatively and creatively and to take risks.
    note2_7_a
    Intercultural understanding: Learning a new language provides unique opportunities for pupils to explore national identities and become aware of both similarities and contrasts between the cultures of different countries, including their own.
    note2_8_a
    Diversity: Many languages are spoken in more than one country and there may be significant cultural differences between these countries.
    note2_9_a
    Other cultures: This could include different aspects of other cultures, such as everyday life, social customs, school life, festivals and events of national importance.
    note2_10_a
    Different ways of seeing the world: These include religious beliefs, social customs, traditions, values, attitudes towards other countries and reactions to world events.
    Key Processes
    These are the essential skills and processes in languages that pupils need to learn to make progress.
    2.1 Developing language-learning strategies
    Pupils should be able to:
    identify patterns in the target language
    develop techniques for memorising words, phrases and spellings
    use their knowledge of English or another language when learning the target language
    use previous knowledge, context and other clues to work out the meaning of what they hear or read
    use reference materials such as dictionaries appropriately and effectively.
    2.2 Developing language skills
    Pupils should be able to:
    listen for gist or detail
    skim and scan written texts for the main points or details
    respond appropriately to spoken and written language
    use correct pronunciation and intonation
    ask and answer questions
    initiate and sustain conversations
    write clearly and coherently, including an appropriate level of detail
    redraft their writing to improve accuracy and quality
    reuse language that they have heard or read in their own speaking and writing
    adapt language they already know in new contexts for different purposes
    deal with unfamiliar language, unexpected responses and unpredictable situations.
    Explanatory notes
    note3_1_a
    Patterns in the target language: These include patterns in pronunciation, spelling, word order and sentence structure.
    note3_2_a
    Techniques for memorising: These include: identifying similarities between new and known words; associating words and phrases with a physical response, actions, images, the written form or sounds (including rhymes and repetition); practising with a friend or family member; and using the technique ‘look, cover, write/say, check’.
    note3_3_a
    Knowledge of English or another language: This includes comparing new words, phrases, expressions and grammatical structures with English and/or another language that the pupil knows well. This can help pupils to remember new language and to understand how the target language works.
    note3_4_a
    Other clues: These include tone of voice, intonation, non-verbal communication (such as facial expression or body language), key words, similarities between the target language and English or another language, and grammatical function.
    note3_5_a
    Skim and scan: ‘Skim’ refers to reading for general understanding; ‘scan’ refers to looking for specific information in a text.
    note3_6_a
    Reuse language: This includes pupils using language that they have encountered as building blocks for their own spoken or written use of the target language. This kind of ‘borrowing’ of language makes it easier to express ideas or information.
    note3_7_a
    Deal with unfamiliar language, unexpected responses and unpredictablesituations: This includes developing strategies for coping, such as asking for repetition or clarification, listening or looking for key words, and using previous knowledge, context and other clues to try to make sense of what they hear or read.
    page4_a
    3. Range and content
    This section outlines the breadth of the subject on which teachers should draw when teaching the key concepts and key processes.
    The study of languages should include:
    the spoken and written forms of the target language
    the interrelationship between sounds and writing in the target language
    the grammar of the target language and how to apply it
    a range of vocabulary and structures
    learning about different countries and cultures
    comparing pupils’ own experiences and perspectives with those of people in countries and communities where the target language is spoken.
    Explanatory notes
    note4_1_a
    Interrelationship between sounds and writing: This includes underpinning principles such as common letter strings.
    page5_a
    4. Curriculum opportunities
    During the key stage pupils should be offered the following opportunities that are integral to their learning and enhance their engagement with the concepts, processes and content of the subject.
    The curriculum should provide opportunities for pupils to:
    hear, speak, read and write in the target language regularly and frequently within the classroom and beyond
    communicate in the target language individually, in pairs, in groups and with speakers of the target language, including native speakers where possible, for a variety of purposes
    use an increasing range of more complex language
    make links with English at word, sentence and text level
    use a range of resources, including ICT, for accessing and communicating information in the target language
    listen to, read or view a range of materials, including authentic materials in the target language, both to support learning and for personal interest and enjoyment
    use the target language in connection with topics and issues that are engaging and may be related to other areas of the curriculum.
    Explanatory notes
    note5_1_a
    Beyond: This could include using websites, taking part in special days and events, school visits abroad, and exchanges and links with schools abroad.
    note5_2_a
    Including native speakers: This could be face to face, in school (eg with a foreign language assistant), on visits abroad, by email, or through videoconferencing. Communication with young people in a country where the target language is spoken is particularly relevant and can be very motivating.
    note5_3_a
    Variety of purposes: These include real purposes, such as sending and receiving emails, simulated or actual real-life situations, and creative and imaginative work.
    note5_4_a
    Links with English: Learning another language helps pupils develop literacy skills, including understanding the origin of words, formation of structures, grammar and syntax, different text types and drama.
    note5_5_a
    Range of resources: This includes live or recorded audio and video resources, texts (including on-screen and multimodal texts) and the internet.
    note5_6_a
    Authentic materials: These could include textual materials of different kinds, video, television, images or video and audio recordings from the internet.
    Range & Content
    This section outlines the breadth of the subject on which teachers should draw when teaching the key concepts and key processes.
    The study of languages should include:
    the spoken and written forms of the target language
    the interrelationship between sounds and writing in the target language
    the grammar of the target language and how to apply it
    a range of vocabulary and structures
    learning about different countries and cultures
    comparing pupils’ own experiences and perspectives with those of people in countries and communities where the target language is spoken.
    Explanatory notes
    note4_1_a
    Interrelationship between sounds and writing: This includes underpinning principles such as common letter strings.
    Curriculum Opportunities
    During the key stage pupils should be offered the following opportunities that are integral to their learning and enhance their engagement with the concepts, processes and content of the subject.
    The curriculum should provide opportunities for pupils to:
    hear, speak, read and write in the target language regularly and frequently within the classroom and beyond
    communicate in the target language individually, in pairs, in groups and with speakers of the target language, including native speakers where possible, for a variety of purposes
    use an increasing range of more complex language
    make links with English at word, sentence and text level
    use a range of resources, including ICT, for accessing and communicating information in the target language
    listen to, read or view a range of materials, including authentic materials in the target language, both to support learning and for personal interest and enjoyment
    use the target language in connection with topics and issues that are engaging and may be related to other areas of the curriculum.
    Explanatory notes
    note5_1_a
    Beyond: This could include using websites, taking part in special days and events, school visits abroad, and exchanges and links with schools abroad.
    note5_2_a
    Including native speakers: This could be face to face, in school (eg with a foreign language assistant), on visits abroad, by email, or through videoconferencing. Communication with young people in a country where the target language is spoken is particularly relevant and can be very motivating.
    note5_3_a
    Variety of purposes: These include real purposes, such as sending and receiving emails, simulated or actual real-life situations, and creative and imaginative work.
    note5_4_a
    Links with English: Learning another language helps pupils develop literacy skills, including understanding the origin of words, formation of structures, grammar and syntax, different text types and drama.
    note5_5_a
    Range of resources: This includes live or recorded audio and video resources, texts (including on-screen and multimodal texts) and the internet.
    note5_6_a
    Authentic materials: These could include textual materials of different kinds, video, television, images or video and audio recordings from the internet.

    (view changes)
    11:29 pm
  3. page Why MFL? edited The importance of Modern Foreign Languages Languages are part of the cultural richness of our soc…
    The importance of Modern Foreign Languages
    Languages are part of the cultural richness of our society and the world in which we live and work. Learning languages contributes to mutual understanding, a sense of global citizenship and personal fulfilment. Pupils learn to appreciate different countries, cultures, communities and people. By making comparisons, they gain insight into their own culture and society. The ability to understand and communicate in another language is a lifelong skill for education, employment and leisure in this country and throughout the world.
    Learning languages gives pupils opportunities to develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills and to express themselves with increasing confidence, independence and creativity. They explore the similarities and differences between other languages and English and learn how language can be manipulated and applied in different ways. The development of communication skills, together with understanding of the structure of language, lay the foundations for future study of other languages and support the development of literacy skills in a pupil’s own language.

    (view changes)
    11:26 pm
  4. page MFL KS5 websites edited Web sites for you to explore to help with MFL A Levels… {http://tbn1.google.com/images?q=tbn:6g…

    Web sites for you to explore to help with MFL A Levels…
    {http://tbn1.google.com/images?q=tbn:6gwpc5H1K9F4WM:http://blogs.zdnet.com/security/images/internet_explorer.png}
    http://rodillianmfldepartment.typepad.com
    http://www.ngfl-cymru.org.uk/eng/vtc-home/vtc-ks3-home.htm
    (view changes)
    8:03 am
  5. page Integrating ICT edited {http://joedale.typepad.com/.a/6a00e54ee8552c883300e55009b6e18834-150wi} My Photo Joe Dale is…

    {http://joedale.typepad.com/.a/6a00e54ee8552c883300e55009b6e18834-150wi} My Photo

    Joe Dale is a Lead Practitioner his aim to spread the integration of ICT into the MFL classroom. Below you see his Biography and the link to his own blog. Also type his name into Google and prepare to be amazed at the sheer enthusiasm of this leading educationalist.
    "I am a full-time French teacher at Nodehill Middle School on the Isle of Wight. I have created many ICT based exercises in line with the QCA scheme of work, including Hot Potatoes, Hangman, Fun with Texts, Spellmaster and TaskMagic activities. In addition to these customised exercises, I also use a selection of freeware from France.
    (view changes)
    8:01 am

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